Thank God He Met Lizzie (1997)


Director: Cherie Nowlan

Stars: Richard Roxburgh, Frances O’Connor, Cate Blanchett

The 1990s were a good time for Australian women filmmakers. On top of the continuing work, both here and abroad, from those who’d emerged or solidified their reputations in the 1980s (e.g. Gillian Armstrong, Nadia Tass, Jane Campion), the decade gifted audiences such films as Proof, Hammers over the Anvil, Floating Life, Love and Other Catastrophes, Love Serenade, Road to Nhill, The Well, Radiance, and Head On, all well-liked if not commercially lucrative ventures from debut or sophomore women feature directors.* Regrettably, some debut or sophomore efforts ended up being swansongs, such as Megan Simpson Huberman with Dating the Enemy, as lamented previously. Cherie Nowlan made her feature debut with Thank God He Met Lizzie in 1997, and while she’d subsequently make only one more feature (2007’s Clubland) she’s been steadily employed in television since, helming episodic television and telemovies both locally (e.g. The Secret Life of Us, Small Claims, Dance Academy, Packed to the Rafters, Underbelly, Rake) and abroad (Gossip Girl, 90210, Grey’s Anatomy, Suits, and the American spin on local crime classic Animal Kingdom).

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Double feature: Love and Other Catastrophes (1996) and Youth on the March (2017)


Director: Emma-Kate Croghan

Starring: Frances O’Connor, Matt Day, Alice Garner, Radha Mitchell, Matthew Dyktynski

In 1992, Quentin Tarantino kicked off Reservoir Dogs with a monologue about Madonna’s ‘Like a Virgin’. In 1994, Kevin Smith punctuated Clerks with a conversation lamenting the fate of the Death Star construction workers in Return of the Jedi. At the risk of simplification, 1996’s Love and Other Catastrophes feels like a film both by and about the very kids that Tarantino and Smith sent scurrying to film school. Tarantino’s venerated status among 1990s movie disciples is even acknowledged in a surreal scene midway through the film (more on that later). A few weeks ago, I commented on Dogs in Space as a timestamp of both when it was set and when it was made; in the case of Love and Other Catastrophes, you can pinpoint not just the era, but practically the month, date, and day of the week it was shot.

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