Aussiewood: Ricochet (1991), Blue Ice (1992), The Real McCoy (1993)

COnnery

This latest installment of Down Under Flix’s Aussiewood series chronicling the adventures and misadventures of Australian filmmakers abroad deals with Russell Mulcahy. This isn’t the first time I’ve written about Mulcahy on this website – see my review of his 2003 sports biopic Swimming Upstream – but it’s my first time writing about the director’s signature action fare. Following his inventive creature feature debut Razorback (1984) and the cult success of Highlander (1986), the stalwart music video director looked to be on an upward trajectory as a filmmaker. However, Mulcahy was fired two weeks into production on the Sylvester Stallone vehicle Rambo III (1988) because he wasn’t shooting enough close-ups of its hubristic star, and the subsequent production and release of the much-maligned (and deservedly so) Highlander II: The Quickening (1991) was a ghastly, pained process. RicochetBlue Steel, and The Real McCoy followed those professional debacles in quick succession, and these three films feel like exercises in directorial penitence: they’re moderately budgeted, straight-down-the-line mainstream features and are largely inoffensive, discounting the innately quippy immorality of the Joel Silver era of action cinema that Ricochet slots into.

Continue reading “Aussiewood: Ricochet (1991), Blue Ice (1992), The Real McCoy (1993)”

John Hargreaves double feature: Hoodwink (1981) and Sky Pirates (1986)

John-Hargreaves

Discounting the film Blackfellas, in which he plays a minor role as a racist policeman, I’m surprised it’s taken this long to cover any John Hargreaves films on Down Under Flix. A six time AFI Award nominee (including for Hoodwink) and triple winner, Hargreaves is one of the best leading men to emerge from the Australian New Wave, and I have particular regard for his work in Don’s Party, Long Weekend, and The Odd Angry Shot. Hargreaves was a natural performer: gifted and charismatic, but not unnecessarily flashy; handsome, but not movie star handsome, and slightly crumpled like a creased jacket. He was a quintessential Australian everyman ala Jack Thompson and Bryan Brown, though he’s less familiar to young filmgoers today, partly due to his untimely passing in 1996 at age 50. This article looks at one of Hargreaves’ best films… and one of his other films…

Continue reading “John Hargreaves double feature: Hoodwink (1981) and Sky Pirates (1986)”

Macbeth (2006)

MACBETH

Director: Geoffrey Wright

Stars: Sam Worthington, Victoria Hill, Gary Sweet, Lachy Hulme

Second viewing, via DVD

It’s fascinating that in the short space of ten years, two Australian filmmakers have adapted William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. While the Bard’s play is an all-timer, and has been adapted in the past by master directors like Orson Welles, Akira Kurosawa, and Roman Polanski, film adaptations haven’t exactly been abundant. So the fact that two Australians would choose to steer it to the screen less than a decade apart is a weird anomaly, though not inexplicable. One could conjecture at length about the 400+ year old “Scottish” play’s relevance to contemporary Australian identity, the timelessness of its depiction of ambition, greed, conspiracy, regicide, guilt, and hubris… but really, it’s just a terrific, badass piece of source material.

I really wanted to like Justin Kurzel’s 2015 adaptation of Macbeth starring Michael Fassbender. Kurzel’s a very good filmmaker – his 2011 film Snowtown, about the murders that transpired in the South Australian town of the same name, is exceptional – and I like that he committed to a very particular take on the source. I just wasn’t a fan of that relentlessly gridmark take. I also can’t help but question the casting of Marion Cotillard as Lady Macbeth: she’s a tremendous actress, but also possibly the least Scottish person on the planet, and that planet includes Jackie Chan, Deepak Chopra and Usain Bolt.

Continue reading “Macbeth (2006)”

Felony (2013)

Felony poster

Director: Matthew Saville

Stars: Joel Edgerton, Jai Courtney, Tom Wilkinson, Melissa George

First viewing, via Stan

Joel Edgerton, on top of being a sturdy actor in local and international fare ranging from Animal Kingdom to the Star Wars prequels, has emerged as one hell of a writer in recent years. He co-wrote the contemporary noir gem The Square, co-conceived the post-apocalyptic road thriller The Rover, and scripted this fine cut of moral quandary, Felony.

Edgerton headlines Felony as Malcolm Toohey, a police detective on the cusp of decimating an organised crime ring. When driving home after a long evening of festive boozing, he accidentally hits a young boy on a bicycle. He calls 000 (Australia’s 911 for overseas readers) but tells them he only found the injured child lying on the road. Veteran detective Carl Summer (Tom Wilkinson) discreetly helps Toohey bluff his way through the scene, but Summer’s young partner Jim Melic (Jai Courtney) senses something rotten in Denmark and investigates.

Continue reading “Felony (2013)”