Australia Day (2017)

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Director: Kriv Stenders

Starring: Bryan Brown, Jenny Wu, Shari Sebbens, Miah Madden, Elias Anton, Sean Keenan

Typically Down Under Flix eschews films currently in cinemas, but I thought I’d make an exception for Kriv Stenders’ Australia Day, which is in limited release and has simultaneously made its video-on-demand debut via Dendy Direct and the Foxtel Store. Stenders’ film has divided both viewers and critics, with Luke Buckmaster in The Guardian and Blake Howard in Daily Review nicely encapsulating some of the key criticisms leveled at the film.

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1987 Triple Feature: Dot Goes to Hollywood, Dogs in Space, High Tide

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Every week, another film turns 30 years old. And if you visit movie websites or frequent “Film Twitter”, you’re bound to hear about it. Robocop turned 30? Here are 12 fun facts from The Wrap. Lethal Weapon turned 30? Here are 15 fun facts courtesy of Metro. Predator turned 30? Here’s an oral history from The Hollywood Reporter. Full Metal Jacket turned 30? Jo Blo’s got you covered with a Matthew Modine/Vincent D’Onofrio interview. Not a lot of local films get the 30 year commemoration (partly because they don’t lend themselves as easily to nostalgia-tugging click-bait), so I figured it was time to get into the 30th anniversary business and shine a light on some 1987 releases. I’ve already reviewed several 1987 titles on Down Under Flix, including Les Patterson Saves the World, The Time Guardian, and The Year My Voice Broke; other notable releases include Kangaroo, The Lighthorsemen, and Travelling North. Suffice to say, it was an eclectic year, and the three film discussed below are the very definition of a mixed bunch.

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Paradise Found (2003)

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Director: Mario Andreacchio

Stars: Kiefer Sutherland, Natassja Kinski, Alun Armstrong, Chris Haywood, Nicholas Hope

Second viewing, via DVD

A broad ocker comedy. A gritty police procedural charting murky moral waters. A Shakespeare adaptation. A road movie about Indigenous youth. An art-house drama about intimacy issues. Given the variety of films covered on Down Under Flix thus far, it’s fairly clear that “Australian cinema” is a fluid, rubbery, malleable term that can encompass a range of different genres, styles and tones.

Paradise Found, a film about a French artist in Tahiti starring the guy from The Lost Boys and 24, is another Australian film, and a somewhat unlikely one. But this Paul Gauguin biopic has an Australian director, Mario Andreacchio; it features veteran Australian actors in supporting roles; it was filmed in Queensland as well as the Czech Republic; and it was funded by Australian as well as French, German and British financiers. And while we tend to associate such cinematic appropriations of other cultures and historical figures with Hollywood – by way of example, Anthony Quinn scored an Oscar for playing Gauguin in Vincente Minnelli’s 1956 Vincent van Gogh biopic Lust for Life – it’s also a typical instance of cinematic globalization in action.

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Human Touch (2004)

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Director: Paul Cox

Stars: Jacqueline McKenzie, Aaron Blabey, Chris Haywood

First viewing, via SBS On Demand

With the recent passing of director Paul Cox, it seemed appropriate to track down and commemorate one of his films on Down Under Flix. A brief caveat: prior to this week’s film, 2004’s Human Touch, I’d only seen two of Cox’s other works – the arch drama Man of Flowers (1983) and the low-fi period epic Molokai: The Story of Father Damien (1999) – and both long ago. Suffice to say, this is something I’ll be remedying over my time on this website, but in the meantime it leaves me an ill-informed tributary. For lovely, rounded tributes to the filmmaker, see here and here.

Human Touch stars Jacqueline McKenzie as Anna, the talented lead singer in a choir that’s raising money to visit China. Anna finds a fan in Edward (Chris Haywood), a wealthy gentleman with an open marriage and artistic bent who has dedicated himself to “women, love, and the arts”. Edward pays Anna to pose for some artful nude photographs, and the film traces the ripple effects this has on their respective relationships. In particular, Anna becomes distant from her partner David (Aaron Blabey) and resistant to his touch.

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