Human Touch (2004)


Director: Paul Cox

Stars: Jacqueline McKenzie, Aaron Blabey, Chris Haywood

First viewing, via SBS On Demand

With the recent passing of director Paul Cox, it seemed appropriate to track down and commemorate one of his films on Down Under Flix. A brief caveat: prior to this week’s film, 2004’s Human Touch, I’d only seen two of Cox’s other works – the arch drama Man of Flowers (1983) and the low-fi period epic Molokai: The Story of Father Damien (1999) – and both long ago. Suffice to say, this is something I’ll be remedying over my time on this website, but in the meantime it leaves me an ill-informed tributary. For lovely, rounded tributes to the filmmaker, see here and here.

Human Touch stars Jacqueline McKenzie as Anna, the talented lead singer in a choir that’s raising money to visit China. Anna finds a fan in Edward (Chris Haywood), a wealthy gentleman with an open marriage and artistic bent who has dedicated himself to “women, love, and the arts”. Edward pays Anna to pose for some artful nude photographs, and the film traces the ripple effects this has on their respective relationships. In particular, Anna becomes distant from her partner David (Aaron Blabey) and resistant to his touch.

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Beneath Clouds (2002)

Poster BC

Director: Ivan Sen

Actors: Danielle Hall, Damian Pitt

First viewing, via DVD

Ivan Sen’s latest film Goldstone premiered at the Sydney Film Festival earlier this month and is due for wider release in July, making this a good time to check out his debut feature, 2002’s Beneath Clouds. Sen won Best Director at that year’s Australian Film Institute Awards, in what proved a significant year for Indigenous-themed films: on top of Sen’s Best Director win, Best Film went to Phillip Noyce’s Rabbit-Proof Fence and Best Actor went to David Gulpilil for The Tracker, and all three films were nominated and/or won in multiple categories.

Beneath Clouds follows two young Indigenous teenagers hitch-hiking to Sydney through rural New South Wales. Lena (Danielle Hall) is the daughter of an absent Irish father and a negligent mother. Vaughan (Damian Pitt) is a juvenile delinquent working on a prison farm who finds out his mother is ill. Both characters resolve to escape their prisons – literal in Vaughan’s case and small time life in Lena’s – and set off to Sydney, Lena to see her father and Vaughan to visit his ailing mother. They meet on the road and end up travelling side by side. Initially cynical of each other and verbally combative, they form a strong bond as their journey progresses.

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Macbeth (2006)


Director: Geoffrey Wright

Stars: Sam Worthington, Victoria Hill, Gary Sweet, Lachy Hulme

Second viewing, via DVD

It’s fascinating that in the short space of ten years, two Australian filmmakers have adapted William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. While the Bard’s play is an all-timer, and has been adapted in the past by master directors like Orson Welles, Akira Kurosawa, and Roman Polanski, film adaptations haven’t exactly been abundant. So the fact that two Australians would choose to steer it to the screen less than a decade apart is a weird anomaly, though not inexplicable. One could conjecture at length about the 400+ year old “Scottish” play’s relevance to contemporary Australian identity, the timelessness of its depiction of ambition, greed, conspiracy, regicide, guilt, and hubris… but really, it’s just a terrific, badass piece of source material.

I really wanted to like Justin Kurzel’s 2015 adaptation of Macbeth starring Michael Fassbender. Kurzel’s a very good filmmaker – his 2011 film Snowtown, about the murders that transpired in the South Australian town of the same name, is exceptional – and I like that he committed to a very particular take on the source. I just wasn’t a fan of that relentlessly gridmark take. I also can’t help but question the casting of Marion Cotillard as Lady Macbeth: she’s a tremendous actress, but also possibly the least Scottish person on the planet, and that planet includes Jackie Chan, Deepak Chopra and Usain Bolt.

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Felony (2013)

Felony poster

Director: Matthew Saville

Stars: Joel Edgerton, Jai Courtney, Tom Wilkinson, Melissa George

First viewing, via Stan

Joel Edgerton, on top of being a sturdy actor in local and international fare ranging from Animal Kingdom to the Star Wars prequels, has emerged as one hell of a writer in recent years. He co-wrote the contemporary noir gem The Square, co-conceived the post-apocalyptic road thriller The Rover, and scripted this fine cut of moral quandary, Felony.

Edgerton headlines Felony as Malcolm Toohey, a police detective on the cusp of decimating an organised crime ring. When driving home after a long evening of festive boozing, he accidentally hits a young boy on a bicycle. He calls 000 (Australia’s 911 for overseas readers) but tells them he only found the injured child lying on the road. Veteran detective Carl Summer (Tom Wilkinson) discreetly helps Toohey bluff his way through the scene, but Summer’s young partner Jim Melic (Jai Courtney) senses something rotten in Denmark and investigates.

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Welcome to Woop Woop (1997)


Director: Stephan Elliott

Stars: Johnathon Schaech, Rod Taylor, Susie Porter, Dee Smart

First viewing, via Stan

Where to begin?

I’ve spent a good chunk of the past few weeks pondering that question, wondering what film to launch this website with.

Obviously, given the site’s focus on films that flew under the radar or fell through the cracks, it couldn’t be one of the 41 films to win Best Picture at Australia’s version of the Oscars, the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (formerly Australian Film Institute) awards. Nor could it be on this list of the 100 highest earning Australian films. That’s not to say films on either list won’t crop up eventually – commercial or award success aren’t always guarantors of cultural longevity – but simply that they won’t be cropping up yet.

No, the first film spotlighted had to firmly reflect Down Under Flix’s mission statement: a film that had slipped from or never hit the cultural consciousness, that had fallen into neglect and needed some attention. Something to set the tone, both for the site and myself. And, of course, I wanted to start with a bang.

Welcome to Woop Woop ticked all those boxes, especially the “start with a bang” part. In fact, if there was ever an explosion in an Australian souvenir shop, the town of Woop Woop would be created from the scattered debris.

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Mission statement

Australia has an impressive and eclectic national cinema, but too often its films struggle to attract attention, receive brief theatrical runs, are ignored by audiences, and simply fall through the cracks. Down Under Flix was created to shine a light, show some love, and where necessary throw shade at obscure, forgotten, neglected, or under-appreciated Australian films. Each week starting in June 2016, a different feature film will be reviewed and spotlighted. Recommendations welcome…